Friday

Long Live Teo Macero

Teo Macero, the legend behind the boards of Miles' greatest LPs and a true pioneer of studio wizardry has just passed away. Here's a look back at one of his unsung masterpieces; four days of Miles at the Fillmore in 1970, scrupulously edited down to four sides of vinyl. A true testament to Macero's unparalleled genius. Teo on the far right. Dapper as always at a Miles session in the mid 70s.


4 comments:

TLT said...

He was a catalyst for so much great music, from Miles to Mingus. Who knew jazz could be heard as a collage until Teo got a hold of the tapes? We'll miss you.

thebeathunters said...

teo was sure a seminal element in miles' 70's sound as we heard it first (before the unedited boxsets versions)
coincidentally, as i'm trying to complete my american clavé collection teo's album is the one missing...
any help will be a blessing

mauro said...

Thanks! For whatever reason this one's slipped through the cracks of my listening. I have most of the Miles stuff available from 64 on, but for whatever reason never heard this one. I think it's the same band as the Isle Of Wight band, which means Gary Bartz on sax, no? Either way, Miles had some excellent bands in the late sixties/early 70's and mos players went on to record a few masterpieces of their own with that late 60's Miles influence as the main ingredient (Bartz's first few Lps, Herbie's Mwandishi stuff, Zawinul S/T, etc etc) Thanks again, love your blog and have heard some great stuff here!

Mr. said...

thanks for the (sad) news. Teo definitely had a hand in shaping 20th century music as we (electronically) hear it. A Pioneer, A Catalyst.

suggested listening - Miles Davis' "He Loved Him Madly" from "Get Up With It". Miles requiem for Duke Ellington which Teo edited/produced.

worth checking out is Teo's lp on Kip Hanrahan's American Clave label. does any one have this to post?
http://www.americanclave.com/1-records-pages/1002-teo.html